Novela shows the racism practiced by whites and among blacks: Interracial romance of ‘O Outro Lado do Paraíso’ discusses different practices of discrimination

You get racialized sexism, the marginalization of Black men, and white male saviorism in those novellas. That’s how I see them in both Brazil and the US. They pair Black women with White men, not with Black men and it’s disturbing and bothersome to me.

Black Women Of Brazil

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Note from BW of Brazil: Such a simplistic analysis of what’s going on in this novela. But, in reality, I don’t expect much when the topic is Globo TV novelas, racism and interracial relationships, if the writer doesn’t have a background in studying racial issues from a more critical perspective. The article below doesn’t really delve too deep into the messages embedded in this novela that it is supposed to be reviewing. But then again, nowadays we are dealing with a new form of racism, a sort of “Racism 2.0” that the untrained eye won’t catch. Let’s see how the article below deals with the issue first…

novelaooutro Telma Souza, Caio Paduan and Erika Januza are part of the cast of the Globo novela ‘O Outro Lado do Paraíso’

Novela shows the racism practiced by whites and among blacks

Interracial Romance of O Outro Lado do Paraíso discusses different practices of…

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The sexuality of the black woman: objectification and the stigma of promiscuity

Yes, so true. But in America, there’s denial of this painful history as they pair Black women with white men in movies, TV, commercials, newscasts, and advertisements.

Black Women Of Brazil

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Note from BW of Brazil: The debut and now second episode of the new controversial Globo network television series Sexo e as negas has brought front and center a re-ignition of the topic of stereotypes of black sexuality, specifically that of black women. Brazil’s history, from the sexual assault of black women by slave masters under 350 years of slavery, to modern day representations of black women as portrayed by the media, continue the association of Afro-Brazilian women to hyper-sexuality. For activists, the very title of the series in itself continues this association. The subsequent broadcasting of the series confirmed the worst nightmares of female activists who see the black female characters of the show continuing along the same lines of stereotypes about black women that are widely known throughout Brazilian society.

Controversial Devassa beer ad from 2011 Controversial Devassa beer ad from 2011

While the Carnaval season is the most visible time when…

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How long will black women be maids in your novelas (soap operas)? Why Brazil’s media needs more black writers and directors

Black Women Of Brazil

capa Actresses Aline Dias (right) and Erika Januza portray a cleaning woman and a maid in Globo TV programs

Note from BW of Brazil: The more things change the more they stay the same. That’s my basic assessment of black characters on Brazilian TV series novelas (soap operas). Since the debut of this blog, we’ve kept an eye on the role of Afro-Brazilians in media as these images have such a powerful influence on the society. And in six years, we continue to see the same ole same old. The 2000 book and documentary A negação do Brasil – o negro na telenovela brasileira (Denying Brazil) by filmmaker Joel Zito Araújo continues to be the benchmark through which we analyze the long-time, tried and true stereotypes of black people on Brazilian airwaves. In recent years, we’ve seen a number of programs that were presented as supposed advances for black…

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I’m Not Surprised

Eve’s husband’s father racism.  Like I said, swirling is a risk especially for Black women, especially when one try to date/marry into families that are racist or blind to white privilege.